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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
celebrate the life of dr. martin luther king, jr.. my understanding there is statue of him just above and i wonder how that will play into matters today? >> that's right. president obama made reference in recent days feeling connection to dr. king 50 years ago. also to president lincoln, 150 years ago, and so, as part of the inaugurations, we've seen him use bibles from dr. king and also from president lincoln. there is a statue. there is a statue of dr. king in the capitol rotunda of dr. king. so, this martin luther king holiday, obviously takes on extra significance here in the rotunda. we'll watch obviously to see what the president may do throughout the course of his time here in the rotunda. shepard: mike, it was interesting to hear the matters the president brought up, came up throughout this day. we heard, a lot about climate change, the tragedy of newtown came up repeatedly, which clearly, news from the future i believe. from an agenda at least, from the president himself. those were two highlights along with ending the war and bringing the peace and coming together. a lot right the
with the words "holy bible" etched into it. the king bible was dr. king's trebling bible. an avid reader, dr. king traveled with a selection of books that included this bible the president will be using. it was used for inspiration and preparing sermons. henry in huntington, west virginia, on our independent line. caller: i just wanted to call and say, really wish i could be in washington d.c. today. i have a lot of optimism about the next four years. i think mr. obama is doing a heck of a good job. he is getting a lot of his promises down. i hope the next four years are as good as the last. thank you for having me. host: eric in seattle, what do think about all this? -- do you think about all this? you always have to turn down the volume and dirty -- on your tv. in today's inaugural, you'll hear a lot from senator schumer. here he is explaining his role in today's inauguration. >> the hardest part is trying to make sure everybody, there will be a huge crowd, not as big as four years ago, but a huge crowd, they get to their places, their seeds or standing places. as you know, there were big
short on some of dr. king's ideas. at the end of his life he was fighting for labor rights, milltism and poverty every much as civil rights. but in this speech this president addressed militarism, beautifully, and we believe in enduring security and peace does not mean perpetual war. he spoke about poverty beautifully without ever actually using the word, but talking about we are not a nation of takers, and the fact that he would use the word stone wall and he wasn't referring to a dead general, i was floored. i feel comfortable saying that i think dr. king would have been very proud and impressed with today's speech. >> jennifer: i'm glad to here that. totally agree. we're going to take a break and bring you more analysis of the krer moanny. [ rosa ] i'm rosa and i quit smoking with chantix. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior,
saved the union and had to fight a war, but 100 years later, it was dr. martin luther king, who had to fight another war, a war of ideas and a war of values, look how we have progressed just from the 50 years of martin luther king. i became secretary of state. i became a chairman. as a kid in the south bronx section, unthinkable. and barack obama became president of the united states. >> you had stinging things to say about the republican party. an identity problem, you said. and that there are some people who seem to have a theme of intolerance. >> that's a broader definition of what i meant by intolerance. i think intolerance is when you try to keep people from voting. the republican party ought to be out there, not by restricting voting by requiring i.d., but wanting everybody to vote. you need new messages. new policies. the country is becoming more minority. >> have you heard a lot from that? a lot of people pushing back on you? >> most of the people i've heard from in the last week or so have been very, very supportive. but there are those who consider this the worst thing ima
the aura of dr. king today quite well. >> pelley: and this day being inauguration day and martin luther king day all at the same time. doug, thanks very much. cbs news live coverage of the inauguration of president obama will continue from washington in just a moment. [ male announcer ] nearly sixteen million people visit washington dc every year. some come to witness... some to be heard. we come to make an impact. to learn from leaders... and to lead others. to create... and create change. we are the george washington university... we come to make history. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with fifteen grams of protein to help manage hunger... look who's getting smart about her weight. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. >> pelley: welcome back to cbs news
down the mall toward lincoln's memorial where dr. king gave his most famous speech. to spell out the country his vision for the next four years. it is america's quadrennial celebration of the office of the presidency, the orderly transition of power, the luminaries, the singers, the salutes, the speech, the pomp, the circumstance, the second inauguration of president barack obama starts right now. >>> welcome to washington. it is chilly but frankly bearable outside as the country prepares to celebrate the peaceful maintenance of power, the transferns of power from the first term administration of president barack obama to his second term administration. the president was officially sworn in by chief justice john roberts yesterday at the blue room at the white house as the first lady and the obama daughters looked on. but in the little less than two hours the president will affirm that oath before a much larger crowd with 100% more pomp and an equal proportion of circumstance. we have a stellar group of guests joining us throughout the day. honestly, to cut to the chase, it is pre
'll come through the rotunda, walk by that bust of dr. martin luther king, jr., and then into statuary hall for a tradition that's the most exclusive lunch you can imagine. all of the nation's leaders, the president, the vice president, congressional leaders, supreme court justices, their spouses, they will all gather for a lunch to put politics aside for at least a brief moment. >> thank you very much, jan. >>> as we watch the president's motorcade approaching the capitol, let me give you a little bit of an advanced look on what you're seeing as the inauguration ceremonies proceed. as we mentioned, senator charles schumer of new york will be the master of ceremonies. he will have a short speech and then he will be introducing myrlie evers-williams, a former chair of the naacp and the widow of medgar evers. the naacp field secretary who was gunned down in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on t
of ms. evers representing the legacy of dr. king. the cuban american poet representing that particular aspect of the diversity, if you will, that -- and how this president got re-elected all here, all having their place on the platform. the other thing i have to say, too, you know, we are reminded that the inauguration day celebration is basically a three-part play. this is ending. the president will be inside the capitol for about an hour. we will move on, of course, to the parade this afternoon and tonight those two inaugural balls, if you will. but, again, having inauguration day, too, on the martin luther king holiday, amazing symmetry for us long-time washingtonians who get to work heerl during the week. >> for only the second time has the inauguration taken place on a king day holiday. back in bill clinton's second inaugural was the second time. eamon jabbers has been out there. the first thing i noticed how many sort of multi-generational groups there were and how many african-americans were coming to washington bringing either their parents or their grandparents to see this eve
proclamation, almost 50 years after the march on washington, dr. king delivered the i have a dream speech, it says something about the distance we have come, the progress we have made and for him to make a speech that was so inclusive, it was about black people, white people, asian americans, latino, native americans, straight, gay, that we're one people. we're one family. we are one house. we all live in the american house. >> well, about that last point, congressman, we want to let you go and enjoy your lunch, we all do live in the same house and there you are. you have gone from the struggle earlier in your life to a warrior in the house of representatives. you have got an anxious american public watching. a lot of them would really like to see some folks getting along in washington. what are the prospects for that? >> the prospects are very bright. we're going to continue to work together and pull together, to look out for the common good. one thing i have endured the past three years was a group -- taking democrats and republicans, blacks, whites, latinos, asian americans back to som
. >> the reverend dr. martin luther king, jr., this of course being martin luther king, jr. day, the only the second time in history the presidential inauguration has fallen on mld day. first was the of inauguration of president bill clinton. and this is an important day for the obamas and so many who have come to witness the event here in washington. >> . >> bret: what a moment that is. what a moment to use the mlk bible among-- and the lincoln bible as well for the swearing in and this will be the 50th anniversary this year of the march on washington, you know, and the "i have a dream" speech and now we have our first black president and that's one thing americans of all colors felt so proud about four years ago and still do, the progress this country has made, speaking of lincoln and dr. king. >> bret: and he mentioned those moments as he looked down the mall in this speech today, and said, to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to every soul on earth, marking that day as well. and to walk out with the house speaker and the house majority leader who he will have
, i'm not running because i think it's my turn. i'm running because of what dr. king called, "the fierce urgency of now." "the fierce urgency of now." >> throughout that year, the obama campaign assembled a nationwide network of dedicated volunteers, and they broke fundraising records by mastering the internet. early on obama trailed senator hillary clinton by large margins in national polls, and struggled against doubts and criticism. >> early on, supporting senator obama was a somewhat lonely position within the democratic caucus. it was a lonely position within the congressional black caucus. it will probably shock our children, uh and future scholars that the congressional black caucus lagged in support for the first black president of the united states. >> but obama believed that america was ready to support him, as the embodiment of a message of hope, unity, and change. especially young people, of all races and backgrounds, who were his most enthusiastic supporters from the beginning. >> thank you! what up? what up? what's been so inspiring is not just the size of the crowds
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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